5-Star Book Review – “The End of Suffering: Fearless Living in Troubled Times” by Russell Targ and J.J. Hurtak, Ph.D.

http://www.amazon.com/The-End-Suffering-Fearless-Troubled/dp/1571744681/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

After so many years of spiritual, physics, and psychic study, I rarely encounter new concepts. It is more likely that the concept will touch me in a new way by showing me something new because of the timing of my current exposure to it. What makes this book exceptional is that it taught me new ways of thinking.

I learned who Russell Targ is, as well as the fact that he is a talented physicist, when I read Jim Schnabel’s book on remote viewing. Targ has been part of psi research for decades, and has personal success with earning money using quantum physics combined with remote viewing. He impressed me, which is why I added him to my author list and sought out this book to read more of his work.

There is a lot of rewarding reading in this book. J.J. Hurtak, Ph.D., is an expert in ancient Asian history. The details he provided into the cultures that birthed so many spiritual concepts added amazing depth to the book.

Standout features of the book are that it lives up to its title; if you follow the practices in the book, you can end your personal suffering. Another standout feature is the clear writing style the authors have. In different hands, this could have been a dry, confusing, vague read. Perhaps my favorite feature in the book was reading about psychic studies which were new to me. A true treat. Without the glossary in the back, and the word etymology the authors included, I wouldn’t have been able to make connections between concepts and cultures the way I did because of their thoroughness.

I highly recommend this book to spiritual seekers, fans of quantum physics, and those interested in psychic studies.  If you have read it, I’d love to hear your opinion.

Wolf Pact The Complete Saga by Melissa De La Cruz

Did the Blue Bloods series need a shot in the arm? Yes, it did. Don’t get me wrong, I did enjoy the series. There was a lot of information in these books that we’ve been waiting on to make the world that Melissa De La Cruz created more complete. The world of the wolves, those who have not been turned into hell hounds and those who have, is explored in great detail.

I’ve always liked the character of Bliss, and felt a bit sad for her because of her many challenges. I’m glad to see that she got a bigger piece of the story, even if she did have plenty to learn and do. I also started to like Allegra Van Allen a tad bit more. There was a time when I was seriously questioning what she was thinking.

Wolf Pact The Complete Saga is definitely worth the read and was an excellent lead in to Gates of Paradise.

 

Inferno by Dan Brown (2013)

I just spent ten lovely days with Professor Robert Langdon.  Don’t ask me how I dragged it out for so long, I’m still amazed I could put it down and go to sleep at night.

I am a Dan Brown fan.  I patiently wait the four years it takes for him to bring me and the rest of the world’s Dan Brown fans, another book.  I’m so glad that this one was with my favorite professor.  If you’re unfamiliar with the series, the first one is “Angels and Demons,” the second is “The DaVinci Code,” the third one is “The Lost Symbol,” and “Inferno” is the latest.  The first two are now movies starring Tom Hanks.  I only mention the films if you didn’t already know about them.

I give “Inferno” a full five stars.  You know that’s rare for me.  Why five stars?  Professor Langdon is as brilliant and entertaining as ever.  The action and adventure mixed perfectly with the mystery and the history.  Art history, that is.  There isn’t a lot of symbology in this one.  One teeny, tiny request I would make of Mr. Brown?  Some of the Italian made me scratch my head a little.  I have a basic grasp of the language, but I’m not sure how many fans will appreciate having to guess or go to their browsers to figure out if they missed an important piece of the puzzle.  I don’t think any truly important information was given in Italian, thank goodness.

I’m already patiently awaiting the next Robert Langdon mystery since the world changed forever in a big way by this one.  That’s my only spoiler.  Please, treat yourself to “Inferno” and then join in on the GoodReads discussions about it.  Where will he go with it next?  I know I wasn’t expecting anything like what he delivered.